Tuesday, 25 March 2014

Autumn completed and summer started!

I know it's not seasonal but that's just the way it is! Actually I finished this quilt a couple of weeks ago but kept forgetting to photograph it in daylight.
The raw edge appliquéd leaves are all printed using Thermofax screens and then machine quilted into place. They are not bonded as I wanted them to create a slight shadow on the surface of the quilt.
It took me quite a time to achieve the effect I wanted but I think I got there in the end!
I have now begun work on my final piece of this seasonal quartet which is inspired by photographs of wisteria taken at Wightwick Manor last July.
I really like these trailing pale purple blooms and I am enjoying experimenting with different ways to translate them into fabric. I think there may be more than one piece of work that comes from this summery starting point.

I am quite happy with how this is looking. The background is a white rectangle of fabric with a curved strip of green fabric inserted into it. The 'blossoms' are cut from a hand dyed fabric and bonded into place.
This time I cut a rectangle of black fabric and gave it the same treatment but changing the curve slightly and the positioning of the 'blossoms'. I am considering six of these black and white backgrounds which reflect the mock Tudor facade of this Victorian manor house.

A friend was recently asked if she could finish a quilt for someone whose sight was failing and she brought it along to a meeting last week. The quilt top is almost complete so we set about removing the many hundreds of papers which were fascinating in their own right. Old letters, some hand written, some typed, programmes from theatrical productions, accounts, magazine pages etc. These papers were carefully collected as they tell such an interesting story about the maker.
The reverse of this quilt top looks as good as the front. It was an interesting design of units made from two pairs of octagons using two different fabrics with small squares linking them together.
I think I might be sorting out some suitable papers and cutting them up in readiness for a new ongoing project.....
I wonder how many of us have paper pieced projects tucked away somewhere!
Thanks for reading.

Edwina

9 comments:

  1. Gosh, that's a huge task you've undertaken there...but you're right about the papers being interesting. Might be good to have a hexagon quilt with just the papers. Think what you could say about life!! We went to Wightwick a few weeks ago, and it was gorgeous but sadly it was before the wisteria, which looks lovely.

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    1. Love the idea of a quilt made from paper hexagons Annabel.

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  2. The Autumn quilt is a real success and you can definitely see the shadows. That is wonderful piece of history. Such a pity that most paper piecing today is probably being done over plain white photocopy paper.

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    1. I agree Maggi, this is a much better use of those papers that are too precious to shred or hide away in the back of a cupboard.

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  3. Your Autumn quilt is simply gorgeous - Congratulations!

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  4. Lovely post! The leaves are beautifully as they float down! I hope you can find a use for the papers that keep them together and intact - there is a quilt at The Minerva that has papers of old letters and bills and it is fascinatingly alive somehow!

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    1. Thanks Georgina. I think my friend intends to return the papers to the owner of the quilt once it is finished.

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  5. I am very happy to reach your blog. great color combination and work.

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